3 Keys to Microsite Church Success

Before you launch your first microsite, you need to have in mind the outcome you’re looking for. Are you testing the waters? Are you strategically expanding to a community where God is already at work? Something else?

Then you need to work toward that goal. A successful microsite rarely happens without intentionality on the part of the sponsoring church. Sure, these networked locations may be a trendy thing to do, but that doesn’t mean you can just sit back and expect them to flourish without help.

Success depends upon knowing why you’re moving forward, and it depends on the effort you put into the experience. And, really, you don’t even have to spend much money to make that happen. Instead, focus on these three keys.

Finding the Right Leader

The number one indicator of success for a microsite is leadership. That shouldn’t be surprising. The same can be said for church plants, campuses, and nonprofits. Without a key leader driving home the vision, you’re very rarely going to see growth—numerically or spiritually.

In other words, don’t skimp on this one. You should not launch or incorporate a microsite until you have prayed and waited on God to raise up the right person. Resist the temptation to jump in and hope a leader shows up. I’m not saying that won’t happen, but it’s rare.

Your best leaders for a microsite are very likely already a part of your church—or have been in the past. Look for proven volunteers or ministry leaders who have bought into your mission and have a vision for a new campus. Scan through comments you get from your live-stream. Is there someone who keeps showing up week after week? When you know a key leader will be moving to another city or community, gauge their interest in starting a microsite.

And once you’ve found the right leader, spend time training them. We’ll look at this more in the weeks ahead, but treat a microsite leader the same way you would a new staff member. Invest time in helping them understand where God is leading your church and how the microsite plays a part in that vision.

Setting High Expectations

There’s a reason you should use the term microsite, partner, or network location instead of campus. Many microsite churches meet in homes, and you don’t want to set a level of expectation that you can’t fulfill in a living room, rearranged basement, shared community space, or converted garage.

But don’t let that be an excuse. Your job is to exceed what guests expect.

Set the stage for a worship experience, even if that means moving furniture around or putting up pipe and drape to control the lighting in a garage. Train someone to direct parking in the cul-de-sac. Prepare greeters at the front door and near the parking area. Brew some coffee, or set out some water bottles. Prepare a welcome message based on this week’s sermon (see the next point for more about this). You may even want to set aside a room as a nursery.

The setting of the microsite doesn’t limit your ability to kick it up a notch. Get creative in making people feel welcome and allowing them to worship.

Making Them Part of the Family

When I worked remotely for a nonprofit years ago, I often felt disconnected. Don’t get me wrong. I loved being able to work in my gym shorts, but the company didn’t do a great job involving people who were outside the office. Some weeks, I heard nothing from the office. And, really, I had no idea where the company was going.

I’ve also had some great remote experiences. In those cases, the companies took time to bring remote employees together for training, there were daily or weekly video calls, and they made sure everyone knew where the organization was heading.

In a similar way, microsites work best when the sponsoring church stays connected. Keep your microsite leaders updated on the sermon series with notes and outlines. Send a weekly email to the leader to give them the weekend’s talking points and upcoming events. Include microsite leaders in on weekly production calls. Provide them with the same discipleship and group materials you give to your campuses (you can even just send PDFs if need be). Include microsites in your kid camp plans. Invite key leaders to vision events. Find ways to keep them in the loop.

The more connected microsite attendees feel, the more they are a part of your church, and the more they will carry the mission of the church into the community.

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