How to Resource a Microsite

Recently, we talked about the importance of making your microsite feel like a part of your faith family. That means more than just posting the location on your website; it means resourcing the people who worship there to give them a reason to support the mission and vision of the church. After all, they’re worshiping to the same music and sitting under the same teaching.

By resourcing, I’m not talking about the initial technology investment you’ve made to get your livestream delivered. That could be as simple and cheap as a Chromecast or an AppleTV or as complex as a multisite receiver and projector.

Instead, I’m referring to the ongoing relationship you have with your microsite leader or leaders to supply them with what they need to stay connected. That means investing time and effort into their success, and if they’re going to be successful that’s just what you need to do.

Initial Training

McClean Bible Church, which has a number of microsites, does a solid job getting their leaders up and running by covering the details that go into success. Typically, you can adapt the training you already have, such as training for a new campus pastor or even a small group leader. Granted, you may have to create something from scratch—or heavily modify other training you use—but you want your leaders to be ready.

Help them understand how to set the environment, how to connect with new faces, how to plan a meeting, how to respond to the Holy Spirit’s leading, how to pray for people, how to deal with conflict, how to lead a movement in their community. Help them grab hold of your values and understand why you do what you do. (Actually, these are the same types of things you should be teaching your own staff and volunteers.)

This may take several weeks to cover, but the more you work the soil prior to the launch, the stronger your site will be.

Ongoing Training

They say that vision leaks. And if that’s true on your campuses, there’s an even stronger risk at your sites. With video conferencing solutions available for cheap (or even free—with limitations), you have no reason to put off ongoing training for your microsite leaders. They need you to keep pouring in the vision and explaining what’s coming next.

Dedicate an hour a month (or quarter at the least) to connecting with your microsite leaders. Tell them about the wins at all your campuses, the impact of the current sermon series, the change God is working in you. Ask them to share their own stories (I recommend having them email stories to you and asking one or two to share). Then, give them an overview of what’s coming next. Finally, spend some time talking about one of your values at each meeting.

If you don’t have time for this, at least consider including microsite leaders on your production or planning meetings for Sunday (or recording them to send). You can provide some of the same training in that venue.

Ongoing Coaching

This part’s a bit harder to pull off, but ideally, a seasoned leader in your church should spend time individually with each microsite leader once every week or two. You can spread this around if need be, but the goal here is to provide some hands-on coaching or correcting as needed. Talk numbers, talk spiritual health, talk vision. Hold them accountable to these as you lead them.

The goal isn’t to overwhelm people with meetings. Rather, the goal is to do the type of one-on-one you’d do with any staff member. They need the touch.

Church Materials

Going back to McClean, each week they provide their microsites with bulletins/worship guides and other printed materials for their services. It’s a great way to make guests feel like they’re “at church.” Maybe that’s not feasible for you because of distance or time, and that’s okay. Just get creative.

For example, you can set up an email template for your microsite leader to email those who come. You can provide PDFs of the worship guide, discipleship books, spiritual gifts tests, small group study guides, posters—everything. Plus, you can give them access to a Dropbox folder with images and videos for social media. This keeps the quality higher than if you let them make their own stuff on Microsoft Paint.

Finally, make sure you include them on any “weekend talking points” type emails that you send to staff. If you don’t have one of those, get someone to take notes at your meetings and send those. You want to make sure microsite leaders walk people through the same response time and next steps as your campuses.

Times to Connect

Don’t forget the fun. Invite microsite leaders to your staff retreats, all staff gatherings, and other staff adventures. There’s no better way to keep the “us versus them” mentality at bay than making it feel like everyone is an “us.”

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